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Database Commons - HGMD

HGMD

Citations: 2655

z-index 99.88

Short name HGMD
Full name The Human Gene Mutation Database
Description The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD®) is a comprehensive collection of germline mutations in nuclear genes that underlie, or are associated with, human inherited disease.
URL http://www.hgmd.org
Year founded 1996
Last update & version 2016-02-01    
Availability Free to academic users only
University/Institution hosted Cardiff University
Address Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN, UK
City Cardiff
Province/State Wales
Country/Region United Kingdom
Contact name David N. Cooper
Contact email cooperDN@cardiff.ac.uk
Data type(s)
Major organism(s)
Keyword(s)
  • germline mutation
  • human inherited disease
Publication(s)
  • The Human Gene Mutation Database: building a comprehensive mutation repository for clinical and molecular genetics, diagnostic testing and personalized genomic medicine. [PMID: 24077912]

    Peter D Stenson, Matthew Mort, Edward V Ball, Katy Shaw, Andrew Phillips, David N Cooper
    Human genetics 2014:133(1)
    349 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2016-08-12)

    Abstract: The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD®) is a comprehensive collection of germline mutations in nuclear genes that underlie, or are associated with, human inherited disease. By June 2013, the database contained over 141,000 different lesions detected in over 5,700 different genes, with new mutation entries currently accumulating at a rate exceeding 10,000 per annum. HGMD was originally established in 1996 for the scientific study of mutational mechanisms in human genes. However, it has since acquired a much broader utility as a central unified disease-oriented mutation repository utilized by human molecular geneticists, genome scientists, molecular biologists, clinicians and genetic counsellors as well as by those specializing in biopharmaceuticals, bioinformatics and personalized genomics. The public version of HGMD (http://www.hgmd.org) is freely available to registered users from academic institutions/non-profit organizations whilst the subscription version (HGMD Professional) is available to academic, clinical and commercial users under license via BIOBASE GmbH.

  • The Human Gene Mutation Database: 2008 update. [PMID: 19348700]

    Peter D Stenson, Matthew Mort, Edward V Ball, Katy Howells, Andrew D Phillips, Nick St Thomas, David N Cooper
    Genome medicine 2009:1(1)
    619 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2016-11-10)

    Abstract: The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD((R))) is a comprehensive core collection of germline mutations in nuclear genes that underlie or are associated with human inherited disease. Here, we summarize the history of the database and its current resources. By December 2008, the database contained over 85,000 different lesions detected in 3,253 different genes, with new entries currently accumulating at a rate exceeding 9,000 per annum. Although originally established for the scientific study of mutational mechanisms in human genes, HGMD has since acquired a much broader utility for researchers, physicians, clinicians and genetic counselors as well as for companies specializing in biopharmaceuticals, bioinformatics and personalized genomics. HGMD was first made publicly available in April 1996, and a collaboration was initiated in 2006 between HGMD and BIOBASE GmbH. This cooperative agreement covers the exclusive worldwide marketing of the most up-to-date (subscription) version of HGMD, HGMD Professional, to academic, clinical and commercial users.

  • Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD): 2003 update. [PMID: 12754702]

    Peter D Stenson, Edward V Ball, Matthew Mort, Andrew D Phillips, Jacqueline A Shiel, Nick S T Thomas, Shaun Abeysinghe, Michael Krawczak, David N Cooper
    Human mutation 2003:21(6)
    1008 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2016-11-10)

    Abstract: The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) constitutes a comprehensive core collection of data on germ-line mutations in nuclear genes underlying or associated with human inherited disease (www.hgmd.org). Data catalogued includes: single base-pair substitutions in coding, regulatory and splicing-relevant regions; micro-deletions and micro-insertions; indels; triplet repeat expansions as well as gross deletions; insertions; duplications; and complex rearrangements. Each mutation is entered into HGMD only once in order to avoid confusion between recurrent and identical-by-descent lesions. By March 2003, the database contained in excess of 39,415 different lesions detected in 1,516 different nuclear genes, with new entries currently accumulating at a rate exceeding 5,000 per annum. Since its inception, HGMD has been expanded to include cDNA reference sequences for more than 87% of listed genes, splice junction sequences, disease-associated and functional polymorphisms, as well as links to data present in publicly available online locus-specific mutation databases. Although HGMD has recently entered into a licensing agreement with Celera Genomics (Rockville, MD), mutation data will continue to be made freely available via the Internet. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • Human gene mutation database-a biomedical information and research resource. [PMID: 10612821]

    M Krawczak, E V Ball, I Fenton, P D Stenson, S Abeysinghe, N Thomas, D N Cooper
    Human mutation 2000:15(1)
    241 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2016-08-15)

    Abstract: Although 20 years have elapsed since the first single basepair substitution underlying an inherited disease in humans was characterised at the DNA level, the initiative has only recently been taken to establish central database resources for pathological genetic variants. Disease-associated gene lesions are currently collected and publicised by the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) in Cardiff, locus-specific mutation databases, and to some extent also by the Genome Database (GDB) and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). To date, HGMD represents the only comprehensive and publicly available database of gene lesions underlying human inherited disease. By July 1999, HGMD contained over 18,000 different mutations from some 900 human genes, the majority being single basepair substitutions. In addition to its potential as an information resource for clinicians and genetic counsellors, HGMD has allowed molecular geneticists to address a variety of biological questions through meta-analysis of the collated data. HGMD also promises to assist research workers in optimising mutation search strategies for a given gene. A questionnaire sent out to, and answered by, the editors of 20 key journals revealed that human genetics journals are increasingly reluctant to publish mutation reports. Electronic data submission and publication facilities are therefore urgently required. The World Wide Web (WWW) provides an excellent medium within which to combine the centralised management of basic mutation data, including rigorous quality control, with the possibility of publishing additional mutation-related information. In response to these needs, HGMD has both instituted a collaboration with Springer-Verlag GmbH, Heidelberg, to potentiate free online submission and electronic publication of human gene mutation data and developed links with the curators of locus-specific mutation databases. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • The human gene mutation database. [PMID: 9399854]

    D N Cooper, E V Ball, M Krawczak
    Nucleic acids research 1998:26(1)
    180 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2016-08-15)

    Abstract: The Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD) represents a comprehensive core collection of data on published germline mutations in nuclear genes underlying human inherited disease. By September 1997, the database contained nearly 12 000 different lesions in a total of 636 different genes, with new entries currently accumulating at a rate of over 2000 per annum. Although originally established for the scientific study of mutational mechanisms in human genes, HGMD has acquired a much broader utility to researchers, physicians and genetic counsellors so that it was made publicly available at http://uwcm.ac.uk/uwcm/mg/hgmd0.html in April 1996. Mutation data in HGMD are accessible on the basis of every gene being allocated one web page per mutation type, if data of that type are present. Meaningful integration with phenotypic, structural and mapping information has been accomplished through bi-directional links between HGMD and both the Genome Database (GDB) and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Baltimore, USA. Hypertext links have also been established to Medline abstracts through Entrez , and to a collection of 458 reference cDNA sequences also used for data checking. Being both comprehensive and fully integrated into the existing bioinformatics structures relevant to human genetics, HGMD has established itself as the central core database of inherited human gene mutations.

  • The human gene mutation database. [PMID: 9066272]

    M Krawczak, D N Cooper
    Trends in genetics : TIG 1997:13(3)
    258 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2016-08-15)

    Abstract:

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Rate of accessibility:
HTTP status codeDate requested
308 Failed2018-11-16
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308 Failed2018-09-28
308 Failed2018-09-25
308 Failed2018-09-21
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308 Failed2018-09-07
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308 Failed2018-08-31
308 Failed2018-08-28
308 Failed2018-08-24
308 Failed2018-08-21
308 Failed2018-08-17
308 Failed2018-08-14
308 Failed2018-08-10
308 Failed2018-08-07
308 Failed2018-08-03
308 Failed2018-07-31
308 Failed2018-07-27
308 Failed2018-07-24
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308 Failed2018-07-10
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308 Failed2018-07-03
308 Failed2018-06-29
308 Failed2018-06-26
308 Failed2018-06-22
308 Failed2018-06-19
308 Failed2018-06-15
308 Failed2018-06-12
200 OK2018-06-08
200 OK2018-06-05
200 OK2018-06-01
200 OK2018-05-29
200 OK2018-05-25
200 OK2018-05-22
200 OK2018-05-18
200 OK2018-05-15
200 OK2018-05-11
200 OK2018-05-08
200 OK2018-05-04
200 OK2018-05-01
200 OK2018-04-27
200 OK2018-04-24
200 OK2018-04-20
200 OK2018-04-17
200 OK2018-04-13
200 OK2018-04-10
200 OK2018-04-06
200 OK2018-04-03
-1 Failed2018-02-27
200 OK2018-02-23
200 OK2018-02-20
200 OK2018-02-16
200 OK2018-02-13
200 OK2018-02-09
200 OK2018-02-06
200 OK2018-02-02
200 OK2018-01-30
200 OK2018-01-26
200 OK2018-01-23
200 OK2018-01-19
200 OK2018-01-16
200 OK2018-01-12
200 OK2018-01-09
200 OK2018-01-05
200 OK2018-01-02
200 OK2017-12-29
200 OK2017-12-26
200 OK2017-12-22
200 OK2017-12-19
200 OK2017-12-15
200 OK2017-12-12
200 OK2017-12-08
200 OK2017-12-05
200 OK2017-12-01
200 OK2017-11-28
200 OK2017-11-24
200 OK2017-11-21
200 OK2017-11-17
200 OK2017-11-14
200 OK2017-11-10
200 OK2017-11-07
200 OK2017-11-03
200 OK2017-10-31
200 OK2017-10-27
200 OK2017-10-24
200 OK2017-10-20
200 OK2017-10-17
200 OK2017-10-13
200 OK2017-10-10
200 OK2017-10-06
200 OK2017-10-03
200 OK2017-09-29
200 OK2017-09-26
200 OK2017-09-22
200 OK2017-09-19
200 OK2017-09-15
200 OK2017-09-12
200 OK2017-09-08
200 OK2017-09-05
200 OK2017-09-01
200 OK2017-08-29
200 OK2017-08-25
200 OK2017-08-22
200 OK2017-08-18
200 OK2017-08-15
200 OK2017-08-11
200 OK2017-08-08
200 OK2017-08-04
200 OK2017-08-01
200 OK2017-07-28
200 OK2017-07-25
200 OK2017-07-21
200 OK2017-07-18
200 OK2017-07-14
200 OK2017-07-04
200 OK2017-06-30
200 OK2017-06-27
200 OK2017-06-23
200 OK2017-06-20
200 OK2017-06-16
200 OK2017-06-13
200 OK2017-06-09
200 OK2017-06-06
200 OK2017-06-02
200 OK2017-05-30
200 OK2017-05-26
200 OK2017-05-23
200 OK2017-05-19
200 OK2017-05-16
200 OK2017-05-12
200 OK2017-05-09
200 OK2017-05-05
200 OK2017-05-02
200 OK2017-04-28
200 OK2017-04-25
200 OK2017-04-21
200 OK2017-04-18
200 OK2017-04-14
200 OK2017-04-11
200 OK2017-04-07
200 OK2017-04-04
200 OK2017-03-31
200 OK2017-03-28
200 OK2017-03-24
200 OK2017-03-21
200 OK2017-03-17
200 OK2017-03-14
200 OK2017-03-10
200 OK2017-03-07
200 OK2017-03-03
200 OK2017-02-28
200 OK2017-02-24
200 OK2017-02-21
200 OK2017-02-17
200 OK2017-02-14
200 OK2017-02-10
200 OK2017-02-07
200 OK2017-02-03
-1 Failed2017-01-31
200 OK2017-01-27
200 OK2017-01-24
200 OK2017-01-20
200 OK2017-01-17
200 OK2017-01-13
200 OK2017-01-10
200 OK2017-01-06
200 OK2017-01-03
200 OK2016-12-30
200 OK2016-12-27
200 OK2016-12-23
200 OK2016-12-20
200 OK2016-12-16
200 OK2016-12-13
200 OK2016-12-09
200 OK2016-12-06
200 OK2016-12-02
200 OK2016-11-29
200 OK2016-11-25
200 OK2016-11-22
200 OK2016-11-18
200 OK2016-11-15
200 OK2016-11-11
200 OK2016-11-08
200 OK2016-11-04
200 OK2016-11-01
200 OK2016-10-28
200 OK2016-10-25
200 OK2016-10-21
200 OK2016-10-18
200 OK2016-10-14
200 OK2016-10-11
200 OK2016-10-07
200 OK2016-10-04
200 OK2016-09-30
200 OK2016-09-27
200 OK2016-09-23
200 OK2016-09-20
200 OK2016-09-16
200 OK2016-09-13
200 OK2016-09-09
200 OK2016-09-06
200 OK2016-09-02
200 OK2016-08-30
200 OK2016-08-26
200 OK2016-08-23
200 OK2016-08-19
200 OK2016-08-16
200 OK2016-08-12

Tags

Disease DNA
Homo sapiens
germline mutation human inherited disease

Record metadata

  • Created on: 2016-08-12
  • Curated by:
    • Jian Sang [2016-11-10]
    • Lina Ma [2016-09-26]
    • Lina Ma [2016-08-15]
    • Lina Ma [2016-08-12]
Stats