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Database Commons - PDID

PDID

Citations: 2

z-index 0.89

Short name PDID
Full name Protein–Drug Interaction Database
Description a comprehensive set of putative and native protein-drug interactions in the structural human proteome
URL http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/PDID/
Year founded 2015
Last update & version 2015-05-20    
Availability Free to all users
University/Institution hosted University of Alberta
Address Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
City Edmonton
Province/State Alberta
Country/Region Canada
Contact name Lukasz Kurgan
Contact email lkurgan@vcu.edu
Data type(s)
Major organism(s)
Keyword(s)
  • drug-protein interaction
Publication(s)
  • PDID: database of molecular-level putative protein-drug interactions in the structural human proteome. [PMID: 26504143]

    Chen Wang, Gang Hu, Kui Wang, Michal Brylinski, Lei Xie, Lukasz Kurgan
    Bioinformatics (Oxford, England) 2016:32(4)
    2 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2017-04-06)

    Abstract: Many drugs interact with numerous proteins besides their intended therapeutic targets and a substantial portion of these interactions is yet to be elucidated. Protein-Drug Interaction Database (PDID) addresses incompleteness of these data by providing access to putative protein-drug interactions that cover the entire structural human proteome. PDID covers 9652 structures from 3746 proteins and houses 16 800 putative interactions generated from close to 1.1 million accurate, all-atom structure-based predictions for several dozens of popular drugs. The predictions were generated with three modern methods: ILbind, SMAP and eFindSite. They are accompanied by propensity scores that quantify likelihood of interactions and coordinates of the putative location of the binding drugs in the corresponding protein structures. PDID complements the current databases that focus on the curated interactions and the BioDrugScreen database that relies on docking to find putative interactions. Moreover, we also include experimentally curated interactions which are linked to their sources: DrugBank, BindingDB and Protein Data Bank. Our database can be used to facilitate studies related to polypharmacology of drugs including repurposing and explaining side effects of drugs. PDID database is freely available at http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/PDID/. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

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Accessibility

Rate of accessibility:
HTTP status codeDate requested
200 OK2018-11-20
200 OK2018-11-16
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200 OK2018-11-09
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200 OK2018-10-19
200 OK2018-10-16
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200 OK2018-10-09
200 OK2018-10-05
200 OK2018-10-02
200 OK2018-09-28
200 OK2018-09-25
200 OK2018-09-21
200 OK2018-09-18
200 OK2018-09-14
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200 OK2018-09-07
200 OK2018-09-04
200 OK2018-08-31
200 OK2018-08-28
200 OK2018-08-24
200 OK2018-08-21
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200 OK2018-08-14
200 OK2018-08-10
200 OK2018-08-07
200 OK2018-08-03
200 OK2018-07-31
200 OK2018-07-27
200 OK2018-07-24
200 OK2018-07-20
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200 OK2018-07-13
200 OK2018-07-10
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200 OK2018-07-03
200 OK2018-06-29
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200 OK2018-04-13
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-1 Failed2018-02-27
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200 OK2018-02-02
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403 Failed2018-01-12
-1 Failed2018-01-09
200 OK2018-01-05
-1 Failed2018-01-02
-1 Failed2017-12-29
-1 Failed2017-12-26
200 OK2017-12-22
403 Failed2017-12-19
403 Failed2017-12-15
200 OK2017-12-12
200 OK2017-12-08
200 OK2017-12-05
200 OK2017-12-01
200 OK2017-11-28
200 OK2017-11-24
200 OK2017-11-21
200 OK2017-11-17
200 OK2017-11-14
200 OK2017-11-10
200 OK2017-11-07
200 OK2017-11-03
200 OK2017-10-31
200 OK2017-10-27
200 OK2017-10-24
200 OK2017-10-20
200 OK2017-10-17
200 OK2017-10-13
200 OK2017-10-10
200 OK2017-10-06
200 OK2017-10-03
200 OK2017-09-29
-1 Failed2017-09-26
-1 Failed2017-09-22
200 OK2017-09-19
200 OK2017-09-15
200 OK2017-09-12
200 OK2017-09-08
200 OK2017-09-05
200 OK2017-09-01
200 OK2017-08-29
200 OK2017-08-25
200 OK2017-08-22
200 OK2017-08-18
200 OK2017-08-15
200 OK2017-08-11
200 OK2017-08-08
200 OK2017-08-04
200 OK2017-08-01
200 OK2017-07-28
200 OK2017-07-25
200 OK2017-07-21
200 OK2017-07-18
200 OK2017-07-14
200 OK2017-07-04
200 OK2017-06-30
200 OK2017-06-27
200 OK2017-06-23
200 OK2017-06-20
200 OK2017-06-16
200 OK2017-06-13
200 OK2017-06-09
200 OK2017-06-06
200 OK2017-06-02
200 OK2017-05-30
200 OK2017-05-26
200 OK2017-05-23
200 OK2017-05-19
200 OK2017-05-16
200 OK2017-05-12
403 Failed2017-05-09
200 OK2017-05-05
200 OK2017-05-02
200 OK2017-04-28
200 OK2017-04-25
200 OK2017-04-21
200 OK2017-04-18
200 OK2017-04-14
200 OK2017-04-11
200 OK2017-04-07

Tags

Drug and Chemical Compound Interaction and Network
Homo sapiens
drug-protein interaction

Record metadata

  • Created on: 2017-04-06
  • Curated by:
    • Lina Ma [2017-06-01]
    • Shixiang Sun [2017-04-06]
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