Database Commons a catalog of biological databases

Database Commons - FINDbase

FINDbase

Citations: 111

z-index 10.09

Short name FINDbase
Full name Frequency of Inherited Disorders Database
Description FINDbase is an online resource documenting frequencies of pathogenic genetic variations leading to inherited disorders in various populations worldwide.
URL http://www.findbase.org/
Year founded 2006
Last update & version 2016-08-30    v1.0
Availability Free to all users
University/Institution hosted University of Patras
Address Department of Pharmacy,School of Health Sciences,University of Patras,GR-26504,Patras,Greece
City Patras
Province/State
Country/Region Greece
Contact name George P. Patrinos
Contact email gpatrinos@upatras.gr
Data type(s)
Major organism(s)
Keyword(s)
  • genomic variations
  • inherited disorders
Publication(s)
  • Expanded national database collection and data coverage in the FINDbase worldwide database for clinically relevant genomic variation allele frequencies. [PMID: 27924022]

    Emmanouil Viennas, Angeliki Komianou, Clint Mizzi, Maja Stojiljkovic, Christina Mitropoulou, Juha Muilu, Mauno Vihinen, Panagiota Grypioti, Styliani Papadaki, Cristiana Pavlidis, Branka Zukic, Theodora Katsila, Peter J van der Spek, Sonja Pavlovic, Giannis Tzimas, George P Patrinos
    Nucleic acids research 2017:45(D1)
    0 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2017-02-20)

    Abstract: FINDbase (http://www.findbase.org) is a comprehensive data repository that records the prevalence of clinically relevant genomic variants in various populations worldwide, such as pathogenic variants leading mostly to monogenic disorders and pharmacogenomics biomarkers. The database also records the incidence of rare genetic diseases in various populations, all in well-distinct data modules. Here, we report extensive data content updates in all data modules, with direct implications to clinical pharmacogenomics. Also, we report significant new developments in FINDbase, namely (i) the release of a new version of the ETHNOS software that catalyzes development curation of national/ethnic genetic databases, (ii) the migration of all FINDbase data content into 90 distinct national/ethnic mutation databases, all built around Microsoft's PivotViewer (http://www.getpivot.com) software (iii) new data visualization tools and (iv) the interrelation of FINDbase with DruGeVar database with direct implications in clinical pharmacogenomics. The abovementioned updates further enhance the impact of FINDbase, as a key resource for Genomic Medicine applications. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  • Developments in FINDbase worldwide database for clinically relevant genomic variation allele frequencies. [PMID: 24234438]

    Petros Papadopoulos, Emmanouil Viennas, Vassiliki Gkantouna, Cristiana Pavlidis, Marina Bartsakoulia, Zafeiria-Marina Ioannou, Ilham Ratbi, Abdelaziz Sefiani, John Tsaknakis, Konstantinos Poulas, Giannis Tzimas, George P Patrinos
    Nucleic acids research 2014:42(Database issue)
    16 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2017-02-20)

    Abstract: FINDbase (http://www.findbase.org) aims to document frequencies of clinically relevant genomic variations, namely causative mutations and pharmacogenomic markers, worldwide. Each database record includes the population, ethnic group or geographical region, the disorder name and the related gene, accompanied by links to any related databases and the genetic variation together with its frequency in that population. Here, we report, in addition to the regular data content updates, significant developments in FINDbase, related to data visualization and querying, data submission, interrelation with other resources and a new module for genetic disease summaries. In particular, (i) we have developed new data visualization tools that facilitate data querying and comparison among different populations, (ii) we have generated a new FINDbase module, built around Microsoft's PivotViewer (http://www.getpivot.com) software, based on Microsoft Silverlight technology (http://www.silverlight.net), that includes 259 genetic disease summaries from five populations, systematically collected from the literature representing the documented genetic makeup of these populations and (iii) the implementation of a generic data submission tool for every module currently available in FINDbase.

  • Genetic databases in pharmacogenomics: the Frequency of Inherited Disorders Database (FINDbase). [PMID: 23824866]

    Marianthi Georgitsi, George P Patrinos
    Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) 2013:1015
    2 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2017-02-20)

    Abstract: Pharmacogenomics studies how the variations of the individuals' genetic makeup are correlated with a person's response to certain drugs in relation to the therapeutic efficiency, clinical outcome, or even survival, and how they affect drug metabolism, transport, or clearance. Yet, since the incidence of these polymorphisms, being either single-point variations or small insertions/deletions, varies among different populations, a systematic collection and documentation of these variations is warranted, in order to facilitate implementation of pharmacogenomics in different populations. Here we review the existing electronic databases related to pharmacogenomics and pay particular attention in the description of the pharmacogenomics module Frequency of Inherited Disorders database (FINDbase), which documents curated allelic frequency data pertaining to 144 pharmacogenomics markers across 14 genes, representing approximately 87,000 individuals from 150 populations and ethnic groups worldwide. Long-term sustainability of these resources aims to contribute to the design, development, and implementation of pharmacogenomics testing towards the application of personalized approaches in medical treatment.

  • Population-specific documentation of pharmacogenomic markers and their allelic frequencies in FINDbase. [PMID: 21174622]

    Marianthi Georgitsi, Emmanouil Viennas, Vassiliki Gkantouna, Elena Christodoulopoulou, Zoi Zagoriti, Christina Tafrali, Fotios Ntellos, Olga Giannakopoulou, Athanassia Boulakou, Panagiota Vlahopoulou, Eva Kyriacou, John Tsaknakis, Athanassios Tsakalidis, Konstantinos Poulas, Giannis Tzimas, George P Patrinos
    Pharmacogenomics 2011:12(1)
    20 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2017-02-20)

    Abstract: Population and ethnic group-specific allele frequencies of pharmacogenomic markers are poorly documented and not systematically collected in structured data repositories. We developed the Frequency of Inherited Disorders Pharmacogenomics database (FINDbase-PGx), a separate module of the FINDbase, aiming to systematically document pharmacogenomic allele frequencies in various populations and ethnic groups worldwide. We critically collected and curated 214 scientific articles reporting pharmacogenomic markers allele frequencies in various populations and ethnic groups worldwide. Subsequently, in order to host the curated data, support data visualization and data mining, we developed a website application, utilizing Microsoft™ PivotViewer software. Curated allelic frequency data pertaining to 144 pharmacogenomic markers across 14 genes, representing approximately 87,000 individuals from 150 populations worldwide, are currently included in FINDbase-PGx. A user-friendly query interface allows for easy data querying, based on numerous content criteria, such as population, ethnic group, geographical region, gene, drug and rare allele frequency. FINDbase-PGx is a comprehensive database, which, unlike other pharmacogenomic knowledgebases, fulfills the much needed requirement to systematically document pharmacogenomic allelic frequencies in various populations and ethnic groups worldwide.

  • FINDbase: a worldwide database for genetic variation allele frequencies updated. [PMID: 21113021]

    Marianthi Georgitsi, Emmanouil Viennas, Dimitris I Antoniou, Vassiliki Gkantouna, Sjozef van Baal, Emanuel F Petricoin, Konstantinos Poulas, Giannis Tzimas, George P Patrinos
    Nucleic acids research 2011:39(Database issue)
    17 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2017-02-20)

    Abstract: Frequency of INherited Disorders database (FIND base; http://www.findbase.org) records frequencies of causative genetic variations worldwide. Database records include the population and ethnic group or geographical region, the disorder name and the related gene, accompanied by links to any related external resources and the genetic variation together with its frequency in that population. In addition to the regular data content updates, we report the following significant advances: (i) the systematic collection and thorough documentation of population/ethnic group-specific pharmacogenomic markers allele frequencies for 144 markers in 14 genes of pharmacogenomic interest from different classes of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, representing 150 populations and ethnic groups worldwide; (ii) the development of new data querying and visualization tools in the expanded FINDbase data collection, built around Microsoft's PivotViewer software (http://www.getpivot.com), based on Microsoft Silverlight technology (http://www.silverlight.net) that facilitates querying of large data sets and visualizing the results; and (iii) the establishment of the first database journal, by affiliating FINDbase with Human Genomics and Proteomics, a new open-access scientific journal, which would serve as a prime example of a non-profit model for sustainable database funding.

  • FINDbase: a relational database recording frequencies of genetic defects leading to inherited disorders worldwide. [PMID: 17135191]

    Sjozef van Baal, Polynikis Kaimakis, Manyphong Phommarinh, Daphne Koumbi, Harry Cuppens, Francesca Riccardino, Milan Macek, Charles R Scriver, George P Patrinos
    Nucleic acids research 2007:35(Database issue)
    56 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2017-02-20)

    Abstract: Frequency of INherited Disorders database (FINDbase) (http://www.findbase.org) is a relational database, derived from the ETHNOS software, recording frequencies of causative mutations leading to inherited disorders worldwide. Database records include the population and ethnic group, the disorder name and the related gene, accompanied by links to any corresponding locus-specific mutation database, to the respective Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man entries and the mutation together with its frequency in that population. The initial information is derived from the published literature, locus-specific databases and genetic disease consortia. FINDbase offers a user-friendly query interface, providing instant access to the list and frequencies of the different mutations. Query outputs can be either in a table or graphical format, accompanied by reference(s) on the data source. Registered users from three different groups, namely administrator, national coordinator and curator, are responsible for database curation and/or data entry/correction online via a password-protected interface. Databaseaccess is free of charge and there are no registration requirements for data querying. FINDbase provides a simple, web-based system for population-based mutation data collection and retrieval and can serve not only as a valuable online tool for molecular genetic testing of inherited disorders but also as a non-profit model for sustainable database funding, in the form of a 'database-journal'.

Community reviews

Data
quality & quantity
Content organization & presentation
System accessibility & reliability
Reviewed by

Word cloud (embeddable)

Database Commons - Word Cloud

Accessibility

Rate of accessibility:
HTTP status codeDate requested
200 OK2018-11-16
200 OK2018-11-13
200 OK2018-11-09
200 OK2018-11-06
200 OK2018-11-02
200 OK2018-10-30
200 OK2018-10-26
200 OK2018-10-23
200 OK2018-10-19
200 OK2018-10-16
200 OK2018-10-12
200 OK2018-10-09
200 OK2018-10-05
200 OK2018-10-02
200 OK2018-09-28
200 OK2018-09-25
200 OK2018-09-21
200 OK2018-09-18
200 OK2018-09-14
200 OK2018-09-11
200 OK2018-09-07
200 OK2018-09-04
200 OK2018-08-31
200 OK2018-08-28
200 OK2018-08-24
200 OK2018-08-21
200 OK2018-08-17
200 OK2018-08-14
200 OK2018-08-10
200 OK2018-08-07
200 OK2018-08-03
200 OK2018-07-31
200 OK2018-07-27
200 OK2018-07-24
200 OK2018-07-20
200 OK2018-07-17
200 OK2018-07-13
200 OK2018-07-10
200 OK2018-07-06
200 OK2018-07-03
200 OK2018-06-29
200 OK2018-06-26
200 OK2018-06-22
200 OK2018-06-19
200 OK2018-06-15
200 OK2018-06-12
200 OK2018-06-08
200 OK2018-06-05
200 OK2018-06-01
200 OK2018-05-29
200 OK2018-05-25
200 OK2018-05-22
200 OK2018-05-18
200 OK2018-05-15
200 OK2018-05-11
200 OK2018-05-08
200 OK2018-05-04
200 OK2018-05-01
200 OK2018-04-27
200 OK2018-04-24
200 OK2018-04-20
200 OK2018-04-17
200 OK2018-04-13
200 OK2018-04-10
200 OK2018-04-06
200 OK2018-04-03
200 OK2018-02-27
200 OK2018-02-23
200 OK2018-02-20
200 OK2018-02-16
200 OK2018-02-13
200 OK2018-02-09
200 OK2018-02-06
200 OK2018-02-02
200 OK2018-01-30
200 OK2018-01-26
200 OK2018-01-23
200 OK2018-01-19
200 OK2018-01-16
200 OK2018-01-12
200 OK2018-01-09
200 OK2018-01-05
200 OK2018-01-02
200 OK2017-12-29
200 OK2017-12-26
200 OK2017-12-22
200 OK2017-12-19
200 OK2017-12-15
200 OK2017-12-12
200 OK2017-12-08
200 OK2017-12-05
200 OK2017-12-01
200 OK2017-11-28
200 OK2017-11-24
200 OK2017-11-21
200 OK2017-11-17
200 OK2017-11-14
200 OK2017-11-10
200 OK2017-11-07
200 OK2017-11-03
200 OK2017-10-31
200 OK2017-10-27
200 OK2017-10-24
200 OK2017-10-20
200 OK2017-10-17
200 OK2017-10-13
200 OK2017-10-10
200 OK2017-10-06
200 OK2017-10-03
200 OK2017-09-29
200 OK2017-09-26
200 OK2017-09-22
200 OK2017-09-19
200 OK2017-09-15
200 OK2017-09-12
200 OK2017-09-08
200 OK2017-09-05
200 OK2017-09-01
200 OK2017-08-29
200 OK2017-08-25
200 OK2017-08-22
200 OK2017-08-18
200 OK2017-08-15
200 OK2017-08-11
200 OK2017-08-08
200 OK2017-08-04
200 OK2017-08-01
200 OK2017-07-28
200 OK2017-07-25
200 OK2017-07-21
200 OK2017-07-18
200 OK2017-07-14
200 OK2017-07-04
200 OK2017-06-30
200 OK2017-06-27
200 OK2017-06-23
200 OK2017-06-20
200 OK2017-06-16
200 OK2017-06-13
200 OK2017-06-09
200 OK2017-06-06
200 OK2017-06-02
200 OK2017-05-30
200 OK2017-05-26
200 OK2017-05-23
200 OK2017-05-19
200 OK2017-05-16
200 OK2017-05-12
200 OK2017-05-09
200 OK2017-05-05
200 OK2017-05-02
200 OK2017-04-28
200 OK2017-04-25
200 OK2017-04-21
200 OK2017-04-18
200 OK2017-04-14
200 OK2017-04-11
200 OK2017-04-07
200 OK2017-04-04
200 OK2017-03-31
200 OK2017-03-28
200 OK2017-03-24
200 OK2017-03-21
200 OK2017-03-17
200 OK2017-03-14
200 OK2017-03-10
200 OK2017-03-07
200 OK2017-03-03
200 OK2017-02-28
200 OK2017-02-24
200 OK2017-02-21
200 OK2017-02-17
200 OK2017-02-14
200 OK2017-02-10
200 OK2017-02-07
200 OK2017-02-03
200 OK2017-01-31
200 OK2017-01-27
200 OK2017-01-24
200 OK2017-01-20
200 OK2017-01-17
200 OK2017-01-13
200 OK2017-01-10
200 OK2017-01-06
200 OK2017-01-03
200 OK2016-12-30
200 OK2016-12-27
200 OK2016-12-23
200 OK2016-12-20
200 OK2016-12-16
200 OK2016-12-13
200 OK2016-12-09
200 OK2016-12-06
200 OK2016-12-02
200 OK2016-11-29
200 OK2016-11-25
200 OK2016-11-22
200 OK2016-11-18
200 OK2016-11-15
200 OK2016-11-11
200 OK2016-11-08
200 OK2016-11-04
200 OK2016-11-01
200 OK2016-10-28
200 OK2016-10-25
200 OK2016-10-21
200 OK2016-10-18
200 OK2016-10-14
200 OK2016-10-11
200 OK2016-10-07
200 OK2016-10-04
200 OK2016-09-30
200 OK2016-09-27
200 OK2016-09-23
200 OK2016-09-20
200 OK2016-09-16
200 OK2016-09-13
200 OK2016-09-09
200 OK2016-09-06
200 OK2016-09-02
200 OK2016-08-30
200 OK2016-08-26
200 OK2016-08-23
200 OK2016-08-19
200 OK2016-08-16
200 OK2016-08-12
200 OK2016-08-09
200 OK2016-08-05
200 OK2016-08-02
200 OK2016-07-29
200 OK2016-07-26
200 OK2016-07-22
200 OK2016-07-19
200 OK2016-07-15
200 OK2016-07-12
200 OK2016-07-08
200 OK2016-07-05
200 OK2016-07-01
200 OK2016-06-28
200 OK2016-06-24
200 OK2016-06-21
200 OK2016-06-17
200 OK2016-06-14
200 OK2016-06-10
200 OK2016-06-07
200 OK2016-06-03
200 OK2016-05-31
200 OK2016-05-27
200 OK2016-05-24
200 OK2016-05-20
200 OK2016-05-17
200 OK2016-05-13
200 OK2016-05-10
200 OK2016-05-06
200 OK2016-05-03
200 OK2016-04-29
200 OK2016-04-26
200 OK2016-04-22
200 OK2016-04-19
200 OK2016-04-15
200 OK2016-04-12
200 OK2016-04-08
200 OK2016-04-05
200 OK2016-04-01
200 OK2016-03-29
200 OK2016-03-28
200 OK2016-03-25
200 OK2016-03-23
200 OK2016-03-21
200 OK2016-03-18
200 OK2016-03-16
200 OK2016-03-14
200 OK2016-03-11
200 OK2016-03-09
200 OK2016-03-07
200 OK2016-03-04
200 OK2016-03-02
200 OK2016-02-29
200 OK2016-02-26
200 OK2016-02-24
200 OK2016-02-22
200 OK2016-02-19
200 OK2016-02-17
200 OK2016-02-15
200 OK2016-02-14
200 OK2016-02-12
200 OK2016-02-10
200 OK2016-02-08
200 OK2016-02-07
200 OK2016-02-05
200 OK2016-02-03
200 OK2016-02-01
200 OK2016-01-31
200 OK2016-01-29
200 OK2016-01-27
200 OK2016-01-25
200 OK2016-01-24
200 OK2016-01-22
200 OK2016-01-20
200 OK2016-01-18
200 OK2016-01-17
200 OK2016-01-15
200 OK2016-01-13
200 OK2016-01-11
200 OK2016-01-10
200 OK2016-01-08
200 OK2016-01-06
200 OK2016-01-04

Tags

Disease DNA Expression
Homo sapiens
genomic variations inherited disorders

Record metadata

  • Created on: 2015-06-20
  • Curated by:
    • Shixiang Sun [2017-02-20]
    • Jian Sang [2016-04-03]
    • Jian Sang [2015-06-27]
Stats