Database Commons a catalog of biological databases

Database Commons - HMDB

HMDB

Citations: 2615

z-index 235.35

Short name HMDB
Full name The Human Metabolome Database
Description The Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) is a freely available electronic database containing detailed information about small molecule metabolites found in the human body.
URL http://www.hmdb.ca/
Year founded 2006
Last update & version 2013-01-01    v3.6
Availability Free to all users
University/Institution hosted University of Alberta
Address Edmonton,AB,Canada T6G 2E8
City Edmonton
Province/State AB
Country/Region Canada
Contact name David S. Wishart
Contact email david.wishart@ualberta.ca
Data type(s)
Major organism(s)
Keyword(s)
  • chemical data
  • clinical data
  • molecular biology/biochemistry data
Publication(s)
  • HMDB 3.0--The Human Metabolome Database in 2013. [PMID: 23161693]

    David S Wishart, Timothy Jewison, An Chi Guo, Michael Wilson, Craig Knox, Yifeng Liu, Yannick Djoumbou, Rupasri Mandal, Farid Aziat, Edison Dong, Souhaila Bouatra, Igor Sinelnikov, David Arndt, Jianguo Xia, Philip Liu, Faizath Yallou, Trent Bjorndahl, Rolando Perez-Pineiro, Roman Eisner, Felicity Allen, Vanessa Neveu, Russ Greiner, Augustin Scalbert
    Nucleic acids research 2013:41(Database issue)
    561 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2016-01-29)

    Abstract: The Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) (www.hmdb.ca) is a resource dedicated to providing scientists with the most current and comprehensive coverage of the human metabolome. Since its first release in 2007, the HMDB has been used to facilitate research for nearly 1000 published studies in metabolomics, clinical biochemistry and systems biology. The most recent release of HMDB (version 3.0) has been significantly expanded and enhanced over the 2009 release (version 2.0). In particular, the number of annotated metabolite entries has grown from 6500 to more than 40,000 (a 600% increase). This enormous expansion is a result of the inclusion of both 'detected' metabolites (those with measured concentrations or experimental confirmation of their existence) and 'expected' metabolites (those for which biochemical pathways are known or human intake/exposure is frequent but the compound has yet to be detected in the body). The latest release also has greatly increased the number of metabolites with biofluid or tissue concentration data, the number of compounds with reference spectra and the number of data fields per entry. In addition to this expansion in data quantity, new database visualization tools and new data content have been added or enhanced. These include better spectral viewing tools, more powerful chemical substructure searches, an improved chemical taxonomy and better, more interactive pathway maps. This article describes these enhancements to the HMDB, which was previously featured in the 2009 NAR Database Issue. (Note to referees, HMDB 3.0 will go live on 18 September 2012.).

  • HMDB: a knowledgebase for the human metabolome. [PMID: 18953024]

    David S Wishart, Craig Knox, An Chi Guo, Roman Eisner, Nelson Young, Bijaya Gautam, David D Hau, Nick Psychogios, Edison Dong, Souhaila Bouatra, Rupasri Mandal, Igor Sinelnikov, Jianguo Xia, Leslie Jia, Joseph A Cruz, Emilia Lim, Constance A Sobsey, Savita Shrivastava, Paul Huang, Philip Liu, Lydia Fang, Jun Peng, Ryan Fradette, Dean Cheng, Dan Tzur, Melisa Clements, Avalyn Lewis, Andrea De Souza, Azaret Zuniga, Margot Dawe, Yeping Xiong, Derrick Clive, Russ Greiner, Alsu Nazyrova, Rustem Shaykhutdinov, Liang Li, Hans J Vogel, Ian Forsythe
    Nucleic acids research 2009:37(Database issue)
    940 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2016-01-29)

    Abstract: The Human Metabolome Database (HMDB, http://www.hmdb.ca) is a richly annotated resource that is designed to address the broad needs of biochemists, clinical chemists, physicians, medical geneticists, nutritionists and members of the metabolomics community. Since its first release in 2007, the HMDB has been used to facilitate the research for nearly 100 published studies in metabolomics, clinical biochemistry and systems biology. The most recent release of HMDB (version 2.0) has been significantly expanded and enhanced over the previous release (version 1.0). In particular, the number of fully annotated metabolite entries has grown from 2180 to more than 6800 (a 300% increase), while the number of metabolites with biofluid or tissue concentration data has grown by a factor of five (from 883 to 4413). Similarly, the number of purified compounds with reference to NMR, LC-MS and GC-MS spectra has more than doubled (from 380 to more than 790 compounds). In addition to this significant expansion in database size, many new database searching tools and new data content has been added or enhanced. These include better algorithms for spectral searching and matching, more powerful chemical substructure searches, faster text searching software, as well as dedicated pathway searching tools and customized, clickable metabolic maps. Changes to the user-interface have also been implemented to accommodate future expansion and to make database navigation much easier. These improvements should make the HMDB much more useful to a much wider community of users.

  • HMDB: the Human Metabolome Database. [PMID: 17202168]

    David S Wishart, Dan Tzur, Craig Knox, Roman Eisner, An Chi Guo, Nelson Young, Dean Cheng, Kevin Jewell, David Arndt, Summit Sawhney, Chris Fung, Lisa Nikolai, Mike Lewis, Marie-Aude Coutouly, Ian Forsythe, Peter Tang, Savita Shrivastava, Kevin Jeroncic, Paul Stothard, Godwin Amegbey, David Block, David D Hau, James Wagner, Jessica Miniaci, Melisa Clements, Mulu Gebremedhin, Natalie Guo, Ying Zhang, Gavin E Duggan, Glen D Macinnis, Alim M Weljie, Reza Dowlatabadi, Fiona Bamforth, Derrick Clive, Russ Greiner, Liang Li, Tom Marrie, Brian D Sykes, Hans J Vogel, Lori Querengesser
    Nucleic acids research 2007:35(Database issue)
    1114 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2016-01-29)

    Abstract: The Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) is currently the most complete and comprehensive curated collection of human metabolite and human metabolism data in the world. It contains records for more than 2180 endogenous metabolites with information gathered from thousands of books, journal articles and electronic databases. In addition to its comprehensive literature-derived data, the HMDB also contains an extensive collection of experimental metabolite concentration data compiled from hundreds of mass spectra (MS) and Nuclear Magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomic analyses performed on urine, blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples. This is further supplemented with thousands of NMR and MS spectra collected on purified, reference metabolites. Each metabolite entry in the HMDB contains an average of 90 separate data fields including a comprehensive compound description, names and synonyms, structural information, physico-chemical data, reference NMR and MS spectra, biofluid concentrations, disease associations, pathway information, enzyme data, gene sequence data, SNP and mutation data as well as extensive links to images, references and other public databases. Extensive searching, relational querying and data browsing tools are also provided. The HMDB is designed to address the broad needs of biochemists, clinical chemists, physicians, medical geneticists, nutritionists and members of the metabolomics community. The HMDB is available at: www.hmdb.ca.

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Accessibility

Rate of accessibility:
HTTP status codeDate requested
200 OK2018-11-16
200 OK2018-11-13
200 OK2018-11-09
200 OK2018-11-06
200 OK2018-11-02
200 OK2018-10-30
200 OK2018-10-26
200 OK2018-10-23
200 OK2018-10-19
200 OK2018-10-16
200 OK2018-10-12
200 OK2018-10-09
200 OK2018-10-05
200 OK2018-10-02
200 OK2018-09-28
200 OK2018-09-25
200 OK2018-09-21
200 OK2018-09-18
200 OK2018-09-14
200 OK2018-09-11
200 OK2018-09-07
200 OK2018-09-04
200 OK2018-08-31
200 OK2018-08-28
200 OK2018-08-24
200 OK2018-08-21
200 OK2018-08-17
-1 Failed2018-08-14
200 OK2018-08-10
200 OK2018-08-07
200 OK2018-08-03
200 OK2018-07-31
200 OK2018-07-27
200 OK2018-07-24
200 OK2018-07-20
200 OK2018-07-17
200 OK2018-07-13
200 OK2018-07-10
200 OK2018-07-06
200 OK2018-07-03
200 OK2018-06-29
200 OK2018-06-26
200 OK2018-06-22
200 OK2018-06-19
200 OK2018-06-15
200 OK2018-06-12
200 OK2018-06-08
200 OK2018-06-05
200 OK2018-06-01
200 OK2018-05-29
200 OK2018-05-25
-1 Failed2018-05-22
200 OK2018-05-18
200 OK2018-05-15
200 OK2018-05-11
200 OK2018-05-08
200 OK2018-05-04
200 OK2018-05-01
200 OK2018-04-27
200 OK2018-04-24
200 OK2018-04-20
200 OK2018-04-17
200 OK2018-04-13
200 OK2018-04-10
200 OK2018-04-06
200 OK2018-04-03
200 OK2018-02-27
200 OK2018-02-23
200 OK2018-02-20
200 OK2018-02-16
200 OK2018-02-13
200 OK2018-02-09
200 OK2018-02-06
200 OK2018-02-02
200 OK2018-01-30
200 OK2018-01-26
200 OK2018-01-23
200 OK2018-01-19
200 OK2018-01-16
200 OK2018-01-12
200 OK2018-01-09
200 OK2018-01-05
200 OK2018-01-02
200 OK2017-12-29
200 OK2017-12-26
200 OK2017-12-22
200 OK2017-12-19
200 OK2017-12-15
200 OK2017-12-12
200 OK2017-12-08
200 OK2017-12-05
200 OK2017-12-01
200 OK2017-11-28
200 OK2017-11-24
200 OK2017-11-21
200 OK2017-11-17
200 OK2017-11-14
200 OK2017-11-10
200 OK2017-11-07
200 OK2017-11-03
200 OK2017-10-31
200 OK2017-10-27
200 OK2017-10-24
200 OK2017-10-20
200 OK2017-10-17
200 OK2017-10-13
200 OK2017-10-10
200 OK2017-10-06
200 OK2017-10-03
200 OK2017-09-29
200 OK2017-09-26
200 OK2017-09-22
200 OK2017-09-19
200 OK2017-09-15
200 OK2017-09-12
200 OK2017-09-08
200 OK2017-09-05
200 OK2017-09-01
200 OK2017-08-29
200 OK2017-08-25
200 OK2017-08-22
200 OK2017-08-18
200 OK2017-08-15
200 OK2017-08-11
200 OK2017-08-08
200 OK2017-08-04
200 OK2017-08-01
200 OK2017-07-28
200 OK2017-07-25
200 OK2017-07-21
200 OK2017-07-18
200 OK2017-07-14
200 OK2017-07-04
200 OK2017-06-30
200 OK2017-06-27
200 OK2017-06-23
200 OK2017-06-20
200 OK2017-06-16
200 OK2017-06-13
200 OK2017-06-09
200 OK2017-06-06
200 OK2017-06-02
200 OK2017-05-30
200 OK2017-05-26
200 OK2017-05-23
200 OK2017-05-19
200 OK2017-05-16
200 OK2017-05-12
200 OK2017-05-09
200 OK2017-05-05
200 OK2017-05-02
200 OK2017-04-28
200 OK2017-04-25
200 OK2017-04-21
200 OK2017-04-18
200 OK2017-04-14
200 OK2017-04-11
200 OK2017-04-07
200 OK2017-04-04
200 OK2017-03-31
200 OK2017-03-28
200 OK2017-03-24
200 OK2017-03-21
200 OK2017-03-17
200 OK2017-03-14
200 OK2017-03-10
200 OK2017-03-07
200 OK2017-03-03
200 OK2017-02-28
200 OK2017-02-24
200 OK2017-02-21
200 OK2017-02-17
200 OK2017-02-14
200 OK2017-02-10
200 OK2017-02-07
200 OK2017-02-03
200 OK2017-01-31
200 OK2017-01-27
200 OK2017-01-24
200 OK2017-01-20
200 OK2017-01-17
200 OK2017-01-13
200 OK2017-01-10
200 OK2017-01-06
200 OK2017-01-03
200 OK2016-12-30
200 OK2016-12-27
200 OK2016-12-23
200 OK2016-12-20
200 OK2016-12-16
200 OK2016-12-13
200 OK2016-12-09
200 OK2016-12-06
200 OK2016-12-02
200 OK2016-11-29
200 OK2016-11-25
200 OK2016-11-22
200 OK2016-11-18
200 OK2016-11-15
200 OK2016-11-11
200 OK2016-11-08
200 OK2016-11-04
200 OK2016-11-01
200 OK2016-10-28
200 OK2016-10-25
200 OK2016-10-21
200 OK2016-10-18
200 OK2016-10-14
200 OK2016-10-11
200 OK2016-10-07
200 OK2016-10-04
200 OK2016-09-30
200 OK2016-09-27
200 OK2016-09-23
-1 Failed2016-09-20
200 OK2016-09-16
200 OK2016-09-13
200 OK2016-09-09
200 OK2016-09-06
200 OK2016-09-02
200 OK2016-08-30
200 OK2016-08-26
200 OK2016-08-23
200 OK2016-08-19
200 OK2016-08-16
200 OK2016-08-12
200 OK2016-08-09
200 OK2016-08-05
200 OK2016-08-02
200 OK2016-07-29
200 OK2016-07-26
200 OK2016-07-22
200 OK2016-07-19
200 OK2016-07-15
200 OK2016-07-12
200 OK2016-07-08
200 OK2016-07-05
200 OK2016-07-01
200 OK2016-06-28
200 OK2016-06-24
200 OK2016-06-21
200 OK2016-06-17
200 OK2016-06-14
200 OK2016-06-10
200 OK2016-06-07
200 OK2016-06-03
200 OK2016-05-31
200 OK2016-05-27
200 OK2016-05-24
200 OK2016-05-20
200 OK2016-05-17
200 OK2016-05-13
200 OK2016-05-10
200 OK2016-05-06
200 OK2016-05-03
200 OK2016-04-29
200 OK2016-04-26
200 OK2016-04-22
200 OK2016-04-19
200 OK2016-04-15
200 OK2016-04-12
200 OK2016-04-08
200 OK2016-04-05
200 OK2016-04-01
200 OK2016-03-29
200 OK2016-03-28
200 OK2016-03-25
200 OK2016-03-23
200 OK2016-03-21
200 OK2016-03-18
200 OK2016-03-16
200 OK2016-03-14
200 OK2016-03-11
200 OK2016-03-09
200 OK2016-03-07
200 OK2016-03-04
200 OK2016-03-02
200 OK2016-02-29
200 OK2016-02-26
200 OK2016-02-24
200 OK2016-02-22
200 OK2016-02-19
200 OK2016-02-17
200 OK2016-02-15
200 OK2016-02-14
200 OK2016-02-12
200 OK2016-02-10
200 OK2016-02-08
200 OK2016-02-07
200 OK2016-02-05
200 OK2016-02-03
200 OK2016-02-01
200 OK2016-01-31
200 OK2016-01-29
200 OK2016-01-27
200 OK2016-01-25
200 OK2016-01-24
200 OK2016-01-22
200 OK2016-01-20
200 OK2016-01-18
200 OK2016-01-17
200 OK2016-01-15
200 OK2016-01-13
200 OK2016-01-11
200 OK2016-01-10
200 OK2016-01-08
200 OK2016-01-06
200 OK2016-01-04

Tags

Metabolic and Signaling Pathway Protein
Homo sapiens
chemical data clinical data molecular biology/biochemistry data

Record metadata

  • Created on: 2015-06-20
  • Curated by:
    • Chunlei Yu [2016-03-31]
    • Chunlei Yu [2015-11-19]
    • Chunlei Yu [2015-06-27]
Stats