Database Commons a catalog of biological databases

Database Commons - CTD

CTD

Citations: 1016

z-index 67.73

Short name CTD
Full name Comparative Toxicogenomics Database
Description CTD is a robust, publicly available database that aims to advance understanding about how environmental exposures affect human health.
URL http://ctdbase.org/
Year founded 2003
Last update & version 2017-02-01    v1.0
Availability Free to all users
University/Institution hosted North Carolina State University
Address Raleigh,NC 27695-7617,USA
City Raleigh
Province/State North Carolina
Country/Region United States
Contact name Allan Peter Davis
Contact email apdavis3@ncsu.edu
Data type(s)
Major organism(s)
Keyword(s)
  • environmental exposure
Publication(s)
  • The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database: update 2017. [PMID: 27651457]

    Allan Peter Davis, Cynthia J Grondin, Robin J Johnson, Daniela Sciaky, Benjamin L King, Roy McMorran, Jolene Wiegers, Thomas C Wiegers, Carolyn J Mattingly
    Nucleic acids research 2017:45(D1)
    5 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2017-02-20)

    Abstract: The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD; http://ctdbase.org/) provides information about interactions between chemicals and gene products, and their relationships to diseases. Core CTD content (chemical-gene, chemical-disease and gene-disease interactions manually curated from the literature) are integrated with each other as well as with select external datasets to generate expanded networks and predict novel associations. Today, core CTD includes more than 30.5 million toxicogenomic connections relating chemicals/drugs, genes/proteins, diseases, taxa, Gene Ontology (GO) annotations, pathways, and gene interaction modules. In this update, we report a 33% increase in our core data content since 2015, describe our new exposure module (that harmonizes exposure science information with core toxicogenomic data) and introduce a novel dataset of GO-disease inferences (that identify common molecular underpinnings for seemingly unrelated pathologies). These advancements centralize and contextualize real-world chemical exposures with molecular pathways to help scientists generate testable hypotheses in an effort to understand the etiology and mechanisms underlying environmentally influenced diseases. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  • The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database's 10th year anniversary: update 2015. [PMID: 25326323]

    Allan Peter Davis, Cynthia J Grondin, Kelley Lennon-Hopkins, Cynthia Saraceni-Richards, Daniela Sciaky, Benjamin L King, Thomas C Wiegers, Carolyn J Mattingly
    Nucleic acids research 2015:43(Database issue)
    159 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2017-02-20)

    Abstract: Ten years ago, the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD; http://ctdbase.org/) was developed out of a need to formalize, harmonize and centralize the information on numerous genes and proteins responding to environmental toxic agents across diverse species. CTD's initial approach was to facilitate comparisons of nucleotide and protein sequences of toxicologically significant genes by curating these sequences and electronically annotating them with chemical terms from their associated references. Since then, however, CTD has vastly expanded its scope to robustly represent a triad of chemical-gene, chemical-disease and gene-disease interactions that are manually curated from the scientific literature by professional biocurators using controlled vocabularies, ontologies and structured notation. Today, CTD includes 24 million toxicogenomic connections relating chemicals/drugs, genes/proteins, diseases, taxa, phenotypes, Gene Ontology annotations, pathways and interaction modules. In this 10th year anniversary update, we outline the evolution of CTD, including our increased data content, new 'Pathway View' visualization tool, enhanced curation practices, pilot chemical-phenotype results and impending exposure data set. The prototype database originally described in our first report has transformed into a sophisticated resource used actively today to help scientists develop and test hypotheses about the etiologies of environmentally influenced diseases. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  • The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database: update 2013. [PMID: 23093600]

    Allan Peter Davis, Cynthia Grondin Murphy, Robin Johnson, Jean M Lay, Kelley Lennon-Hopkins, Cynthia Saraceni-Richards, Daniela Sciaky, Benjamin L King, Michael C Rosenstein, Thomas C Wiegers, Carolyn J Mattingly
    Nucleic acids research 2013:41(Database issue)
    205 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2017-02-20)

    Abstract: The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD; http://ctdbase.org/) provides information about interactions between environmental chemicals and gene products and their relationships to diseases. Chemical-gene, chemical-disease and gene-disease interactions manually curated from the literature are integrated to generate expanded networks and predict many novel associations between different data types. CTD now contains over 15 million toxicogenomic relationships. To navigate this sea of data, we added several new features, including DiseaseComps (which finds comparable diseases that share toxicogenomic profiles), statistical scoring for inferred gene-disease and pathway-chemical relationships, filtering options for several tools to refine user analysis and our new Gene Set Enricher (which provides biological annotations that are enriched for gene sets). To improve data visualization, we added a Cytoscape Web view to our ChemComps feature, included color-coded interactions and created a 'slim list' for our MEDIC disease vocabulary (allowing diseases to be grouped for meta-analysis, visualization and better data management). CTD continues to promote interoperability with external databases by providing content and cross-links to their sites. Together, this wealth of expanded chemical-gene-disease data, combined with novel ways to analyze and view content, continues to help users generate testable hypotheses about the molecular mechanisms of environmental diseases.

  • The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database: update 2011. [PMID: 20864448]

    Allan Peter Davis, Benjamin L King, Susan Mockus, Cynthia G Murphy, Cynthia Saraceni-Richards, Michael Rosenstein, Thomas Wiegers, Carolyn J Mattingly
    Nucleic acids research 2011:39(Database issue)
    182 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2017-02-20)

    Abstract: The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) is a public resource that promotes understanding about the interaction of environmental chemicals with gene products, and their effects on human health. Biocurators at CTD manually curate a triad of chemical-gene, chemical-disease and gene-disease relationships from the literature. These core data are then integrated to construct chemical-gene-disease networks and to predict many novel relationships using different types of associated data. Since 2009, we dramatically increased the content of CTD to 1.4 million chemical-gene-disease data points and added many features, statistical analyses and analytical tools, including GeneComps and ChemComps (to find comparable genes and chemicals that share toxicogenomic profiles), enriched Gene Ontology terms associated with chemicals, statistically ranked chemical-disease inferences, Venn diagram tools to discover overlapping and unique attributes of any set of chemicals, genes or disease, and enhanced gene pathway data content, among other features. Together, this wealth of expanded chemical-gene-disease data continues to help users generate testable hypotheses about the molecular mechanisms of environmental diseases. CTD is freely available at http://ctd.mdibl.org.

  • Comparative Toxicogenomics Database: a knowledgebase and discovery tool for chemical-gene-disease networks. [PMID: 18782832]

    Allan Peter Davis, Cynthia G Murphy, Cynthia A Saraceni-Richards, Michael C Rosenstein, Thomas C Wiegers, Carolyn J Mattingly
    Nucleic acids research 2009:37(Database issue)
    161 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2017-02-20)

    Abstract: The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) is a curated database that promotes understanding about the effects of environmental chemicals on human health. Biocurators at CTD manually curate chemical-gene interactions, chemical-disease relationships and gene-disease relationships from the literature. This strategy allows data to be integrated to construct chemical-gene-disease networks. CTD is unique in numerous respects: curation focuses on environmental chemicals; interactions are manually curated; interactions are constructed using controlled vocabularies and hierarchies; additional gene attributes (such as Gene Ontology, taxonomy and KEGG pathways) are integrated; data can be viewed from the perspective of a chemical, gene or disease; results and batch queries can be downloaded and saved; and most importantly, CTD acts as both a knowledgebase (by reporting data) and a discovery tool (by generating novel inferences). Over 116,000 interactions between 3900 chemicals and 13,300 genes have been curated from 270 species, and 5900 gene-disease and 2500 chemical-disease direct relationships have been captured. By integrating these data, 350,000 gene-disease relationships and 77,000 chemical-disease relationships can be inferred. This wealth of chemical-gene-disease information yields testable hypotheses for understanding the effects of environmental chemicals on human health. CTD is freely available at http://ctd.mdibl.org.

  • The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database facilitates identification and understanding of chemical-gene-disease associations: arsenic as a case study. [PMID: 18845002]

    Allan P Davis, Cynthia G Murphy, Michael C Rosenstein, Thomas C Wiegers, Carolyn J Mattingly
    BMC medical genomics 2008:1
    39 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2017-02-20)

    Abstract: The etiology of many chronic diseases involves interactions between environmental factors and genes that modulate physiological processes. Understanding interactions between environmental chemicals and genes/proteins may provide insights into the mechanisms of chemical actions, disease susceptibility, toxicity, and therapeutic drug interactions. The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD; http://ctd.mdibl.org) provides these insights by curating and integrating data describing relationships between chemicals, genes/proteins, and human diseases. To illustrate the scope and application of CTD, we present an analysis of curated data for the chemical arsenic. Arsenic represents a major global environmental health threat and is associated with many diseases. The mechanisms by which arsenic modulates these diseases are not well understood. Curated interactions between arsenic compounds and genes were downloaded using export and batch query tools at CTD. The list of genes was analyzed for molecular interactions, Gene Ontology (GO) terms, KEGG pathway annotations, and inferred disease relationships. CTD contains curated data from the published literature describing 2,738 molecular interactions between 21 different arsenic compounds and 1,456 genes and proteins. Analysis of these genes and proteins provide insight into the biological functions and molecular networks that are affected by exposure to arsenic, including stress response, apoptosis, cell cycle, and specific protein signaling pathways. Integrating arsenic-gene data with gene-disease data yields a list of diseases that may be associated with arsenic exposure and genes that may explain this association. CTD data integration and curation strategies yield insight into the actions of environmental chemicals and provide a basis for developing hypotheses about the molecular mechanisms underlying the etiology of environmental diseases. While many reports describe the molecular response to arsenic, CTD integrates these data with additional curated data sets that facilitate construction of chemical-gene-disease networks and provide the groundwork for investigating the molecular basis of arsenic-associated diseases or toxicity. The analysis reported here is extensible to any environmental chemical or therapeutic drug.

  • The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD): a resource for comparative toxicological studies. [PMID: 16902965]

    C J Mattingly, M C Rosenstein, G T Colby, J N Forrest, J L Boyer
    Journal of experimental zoology. Part A, Comparative experimental biology 2006:305(9)
    68 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2017-02-20)

    Abstract: The etiology of most chronic diseases involves interactions between environmental factors and genes that modulate important biological processes (Olden and Wilson, 2000. Nat Rev Genet 1(2):149-153). We are developing the publicly available Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) to promote understanding about the effects of environmental chemicals on human health. CTD identifies interactions between chemicals and genes and facilitates cross-species comparative studies of these genes. The use of diverse animal models and cross-species comparative sequence studies has been critical for understanding basic physiological mechanisms and gene and protein functions. Similarly, these approaches will be valuable for exploring the molecular mechanisms of action of environmental chemicals and the genetic basis of differential susceptibility. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  • The comparative toxicogenomics database: a cross-species resource for building chemical-gene interaction networks. [PMID: 16675512]

    Carolyn J Mattingly, Michael C Rosenstein, Allan Peter Davis, Glenn T Colby, John N Forrest, James L Boyer
    Toxicological sciences : an official journal of the Society of Toxicology 2006:92(2)
    93 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2017-02-20)

    Abstract: Chemicals in the environment play a critical role in the etiology of many human diseases. Despite their prevalence, the molecular mechanisms of action and the effects of chemicals on susceptibility to disease are not well understood. To promote understanding of these mechanisms, the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD; http://ctd.mdibl.org/) presents scientifically reviewed and curated information on chemicals, relevant genes and proteins, and their interactions in vertebrates and invertebrates. CTD integrates sequence, reference, species, microarray, and general toxicology information to provide a unique centralized resource for toxicogenomic research. The database also provides visualization capabilities that enable cross-species comparisons of gene and protein sequences. These comparisons will facilitate understanding of structure-function correlations and the genetic basis of susceptibility. Manual curation and integration of cross-species chemical-gene and chemical-protein interactions from the literature are now underway. These data will provide information for building complex interaction networks. New CTD features include (1) cross-species gene, rather than sequence, query and visualization capabilities; (2) integrated cross-links to microarray data from chemicals, genes, and sequences in CTD; (3) a reference set related to chemical-gene and protein interactions identified by an information retrieval system; and (4) a "Chemicals in the News" initiative that provides links from CTD chemicals to environmental health articles from the popular press. Here we describe these new features and our novel cross-species curation of chemical-gene and chemical-protein interactions.

  • Promoting comparative molecular studies in environmental health research: an overview of the comparative toxicogenomics database (CTD). [PMID: 14735110]

    C J Mattingly, G T Colby, M C Rosenstein, J N Forrest, J L Boyer
    The pharmacogenomics journal 2004:4(1)
    29 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2017-02-20)

    Abstract:

  • The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD). [PMID: 12760826]

    Carolyn J Mattingly, Glenn T Colby, John N Forrest, James L Boyer
    Environmental health perspectives 2003:111(6)
    75 Citations (Google Scholar as of 2017-02-20)

    Abstract: The Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory in Salsbury Cove, Maine, USA, is developing the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD), a community-supported genomic resource devoted to genes and proteins of human toxicologic significance. CTD will be the first publicly available database to a) provide annotated associations among genes, proteins, references, and toxic agents, with a focus on annotating data from aquatic and mammalian organisms; b) include nucleotide and protein sequences from diverse species; c) offer a range of analysis tools for customized comparative studies; and d) provide information to investigators on available molecular reagents. This combination of features will facilitate cross-species comparisons of toxicologically significant genes and proteins. These comparisons will promote understanding of molecular evolution, the significance of conserved sequences, the genetic basis of variable sensitivity to environmental agents, and the complex interactions between the environment and human health. CTD is currently under development, and the planned scope and functions of the database are described herein. The intent of this report is to invite community participation in the development of CTD to ensure that it will be a valuable resource for environmental health, molecular biology, and toxicology research.

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Accessibility

Rate of accessibility:
HTTP status codeDate requested
200 OK2018-11-20
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200 OK2018-09-28
200 OK2018-09-25
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200 OK2018-08-31
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200 OK2018-08-14
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200 OK2018-08-07
200 OK2018-08-03
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200 OK2018-07-27
200 OK2018-07-24
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200 OK2018-02-13
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200 OK2018-01-30
200 OK2018-01-26
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200 OK2017-10-31
200 OK2017-10-27
200 OK2017-10-24
200 OK2017-10-20
200 OK2017-10-17
200 OK2017-10-13
200 OK2017-10-10
200 OK2017-10-06
200 OK2017-10-03
200 OK2017-09-29
200 OK2017-09-26
200 OK2017-09-22
200 OK2017-09-19
200 OK2017-09-15
200 OK2017-09-12
200 OK2017-09-08
200 OK2017-09-05
200 OK2017-09-01
200 OK2017-08-29
200 OK2017-08-25
200 OK2017-08-22
200 OK2017-08-18
200 OK2017-08-15
200 OK2017-08-11
200 OK2017-08-08
200 OK2017-08-04
200 OK2017-08-01
200 OK2017-07-28
200 OK2017-07-25
200 OK2017-07-21
200 OK2017-07-18
200 OK2017-07-14
200 OK2017-07-04
200 OK2017-06-30
200 OK2017-06-27
200 OK2017-06-23
200 OK2017-06-20
200 OK2017-06-16
200 OK2017-06-13
200 OK2017-06-09
200 OK2017-06-06
200 OK2017-06-02
200 OK2017-05-30
200 OK2017-05-26
200 OK2017-05-23
200 OK2017-05-19
200 OK2017-05-16
200 OK2017-05-12
200 OK2017-05-09
200 OK2017-05-05
200 OK2017-05-02
200 OK2017-04-28
200 OK2017-04-25
200 OK2017-04-21
200 OK2017-04-18
200 OK2017-04-14
200 OK2017-04-11
200 OK2017-04-07
200 OK2017-04-04
200 OK2017-03-31
200 OK2017-03-28
200 OK2017-03-24
200 OK2017-03-21
200 OK2017-03-17
200 OK2017-03-14
200 OK2017-03-10
200 OK2017-03-07
200 OK2017-03-03
200 OK2017-02-28
200 OK2017-02-24
200 OK2017-02-21
200 OK2017-02-17
200 OK2017-02-14
200 OK2017-02-10
200 OK2017-02-07
200 OK2017-02-03
200 OK2017-01-31
200 OK2017-01-27
200 OK2017-01-24
200 OK2017-01-20
200 OK2017-01-17
200 OK2017-01-13
200 OK2017-01-10
200 OK2017-01-06
200 OK2017-01-03
200 OK2016-12-30
200 OK2016-12-27
200 OK2016-12-23
200 OK2016-12-20
200 OK2016-12-16
200 OK2016-12-13
200 OK2016-12-09
200 OK2016-12-06
200 OK2016-12-02
200 OK2016-11-29
200 OK2016-11-25
200 OK2016-11-22
200 OK2016-11-18
200 OK2016-11-15
200 OK2016-11-11
200 OK2016-11-08
200 OK2016-11-04
200 OK2016-11-01
200 OK2016-10-28
200 OK2016-10-25
200 OK2016-10-21
200 OK2016-10-18
200 OK2016-10-14
200 OK2016-10-11
200 OK2016-10-07
200 OK2016-10-04
200 OK2016-09-30
200 OK2016-09-27
200 OK2016-09-23
200 OK2016-09-20
200 OK2016-09-16
200 OK2016-09-13
200 OK2016-09-09
200 OK2016-09-06
200 OK2016-09-02
200 OK2016-08-30
200 OK2016-08-26
200 OK2016-08-23
200 OK2016-08-19
200 OK2016-08-16
200 OK2016-08-12
200 OK2016-08-09
200 OK2016-08-05
200 OK2016-08-02
200 OK2016-07-29
200 OK2016-07-26
200 OK2016-07-22
200 OK2016-07-19
200 OK2016-07-15
200 OK2016-07-12
200 OK2016-07-08
200 OK2016-07-05
200 OK2016-07-01
200 OK2016-06-28
200 OK2016-06-24
200 OK2016-06-21
200 OK2016-06-17
200 OK2016-06-14
200 OK2016-06-10
200 OK2016-06-07
200 OK2016-06-03
200 OK2016-05-31
200 OK2016-05-27
200 OK2016-05-24
200 OK2016-05-20
200 OK2016-05-17
200 OK2016-05-13
200 OK2016-05-10
200 OK2016-05-06
200 OK2016-05-03
200 OK2016-04-29
200 OK2016-04-26
200 OK2016-04-22
200 OK2016-04-19
200 OK2016-04-15
200 OK2016-04-12
200 OK2016-04-08
200 OK2016-04-05
200 OK2016-04-01
200 OK2016-03-29
200 OK2016-03-28
200 OK2016-03-25
200 OK2016-03-23
200 OK2016-03-21
200 OK2016-03-18
200 OK2016-03-16
200 OK2016-03-14
200 OK2016-03-11
200 OK2016-03-09
200 OK2016-03-07
200 OK2016-03-04
200 OK2016-03-02
200 OK2016-02-29
200 OK2016-02-26
200 OK2016-02-24
200 OK2016-02-22
200 OK2016-02-19
200 OK2016-02-17
200 OK2016-02-15
200 OK2016-02-14
200 OK2016-02-12
200 OK2016-02-10
200 OK2016-02-08
200 OK2016-02-07
200 OK2016-02-05
200 OK2016-02-03
200 OK2016-02-01
200 OK2016-01-31
200 OK2016-01-29
200 OK2016-01-27
200 OK2016-01-25
200 OK2016-01-24
200 OK2016-01-22
200 OK2016-01-20
200 OK2016-01-18
200 OK2016-01-17
200 OK2016-01-15
200 OK2016-01-13
200 OK2016-01-11
200 OK2016-01-10
200 OK2016-01-08
200 OK2016-01-06
200 OK2016-01-04

Tags

Disease Interaction and Network
Homo sapiens
environmental exposure

Record metadata

  • Created on: 2015-06-20
  • Curated by:
    • Shixiang Sun [2017-02-20]
    • Mengwei Li [2016-04-12]
    • Mengwei Li [2016-03-31]
    • Mengwei Li [2015-12-06]
    • Mengwei Li [2015-06-27]
Stats